blue Archives - Beata Pater
 
 
If you are thirsting for some moving jazz vocals, Beata will quench your thirst, to be sure. A grand excursion through 13 vocal adventures that will both enchant and enlighten your jazz outlook. I particularly enjoyed Beata’s interpretation of “Afro Blue“… many times when vocalists take a jazz classic like that, they try to force it into some vocal mold that was never intended, but Ms. Pater fits the tune to her vocal talent like a silk glove & still projects her lively and energetic spirit through all 4:41! If you’re lookin’ for something a little more “groove-oriented”, you’ll definitely dig “Groove Ensemble“; it would have been nice if it were just a tad longer, though. My favorite, oddly enough, was Beata’s super-scat on “Fly Strip“… a tune that just keeps on “pushin’”!!!! I give this one a MOST HIGHLY RECOMMENDED, with an “EQ” (energy quotient) rating of 4.96. Get more information at Beata’s BLUE page. Rotcod Zzaj An editor once advised against using a musical frame of reference since that would be assuming everyone would be familiar with the comparison that was intended. To refer to Beata Pater as the Polish Bobby McFerrin would be unfair and a gross exaggeration. What would be accurate would be to say that Pater is one of the most intriguing and exciting of vocal talents to emerge since…Bobby McFerrin. This classically trained violinist takes vocal “free jazz” into uncharted territory by utilizing a skill set in the same musical vein of a Sarah Vaughn or Betty Carter while displaying a full spectrum of original sounds. A release of great depth and texture but with a vitality that makes Pater the furthest thing from a one trick pony. Unlike McFerrin, lyrics are out the window and replaced by a “catch and release” of vocal inflection, pitch and tone. The 11 original compositions which are bookended by the iconic classics “Afro Blue” and “Blue in Green” are fresh, highly inventive and captivating in Pater’s masterful control of tonality. While the mesmerizing vocal skills of Pater are in full effect the instrumental moods invoked run the sonic spectrum from Brazilian to Native American in both authenticity and presentation. “Southbound Train” pays homage to Pater’s native Poland’s most famous contemporary composer, Krzysztof Komeda which reinforces the music’s Eastern European feel. Blue is the musical equivalent of Louisiana gumbo, there is a little something here for everyone. While respecting tradition there is an overwhelming contemporary sound that borders on the edge of world music without the self indulgent spirit similar artists display. Musical boundaries are pushed back and then fused with other genres for refreshing originality. Cool. Swinging. Inventive. Beata Pater is a eclectic, quirky and surprisingly accessible and highly recommended! Tracks: Afro Blue; 3/4; West Wind; Freedom Song; Groove Ensemble; Southbound Train; Mr. Tad; Rokminoff; No Go Sleep; The Little Prince; Fly Strip; Sludgekee; Blue In Green. Personnel: Mark Little: piano, B3; Jon Evans: bass; Scott Foster: guitar; Renzel Merritt: drums; Celia Malheiros: percussion; Josh Jones: percussion; Darius Babazadeh: sax, flute; Mikole Kaar: sax, flute, clarinet; Carl Roessler: didgeridoo; David Sturdevant: harmonica. Review by Brent Black
5.0 out of 5 stars Beata Pater: Extending the Possibilities of the Human Voice
“Beata Pater is a Polish born international jazz star, but a star with her own language of music. Classically trained as a violinist in the Music Academy of Warsaw, Pater understands rhythm, pitch, the vocalise, and the juxtaposition of musical lines better than many of our finest classical musicians, and yet she employs all of these traits to her unique gifts as a jazz singer. Rather than concentrating on lyrics Pater instead puts her abilities to the test of communicating a song’s meaning through simply using her rather incredible instrument of a voice to produce musical lines instrumentally. On this fascinating CD she performs works written with her pianist/composer partner Mark Little though she does open the album with a work ‘Afro Blue’ by Mongo Santamaria. In ‘West Wind’ she shares the spotlight equally with Little and it is a contest of pitches and rhythms. When a singer relies solely on notes and vocalization of pitches she better have a broad spectrum of musical sounds and that is where Pater impresses. Everything here is wordless, not unlike the scat singing of the famous ladies of song Sarah Vaughn, Shirley Horn, Carmen McRae etc. The ensemble collected for this concert is comprised of Mark little, piano, Jon Evans, bass, Scott Foster, guitar, Renzel Merrit, drums, Celia Malheiros and Josh Jones, percussion, Darius Babaazadeh, sax and flute, Mikole Kaar, sax/flute/clarinet, Carl Roessler, didgeridoo (prominent on ‘Mr. Tad’ where the other feature is Renzel Merrit’s Rasta incantations!), and David Sturdevant, harmonica. And what a phenomenal group of instrumentalists this is – equal to Beata Pater’s concept of jazz. This is strange listening at first, but stick through the album and you’ll likely be seeking out her other releases. She is a bit of a wonder! Grady Harp”
Amazon.com

“Polish-born Beata Pater started out as a violinist and later discovered her singing voice. This might explain why she preferred to sing wordless vocals in standards like Krzysztof Komeda’s “No Go Sleep” and “Southbound Train,” which are among the few covers on her US debut. Playing with an ensemble formed by West Coast- and Japan-based musicians, Pater offers an eclectic mix that draws both from her classical training, Brazilian jazz and more avant-garde influences. To illustrate, the record opens with Mongo Santamaria’s “Afro Blue,” a samba-inflected tune that features Brazilian percussionist and vocalist Celia Malheiros, but further in you hear “Mr. Tad,” a contemporary original piece in an odd tempo that opens with Carl Roessler’s didgeridoo and odd (uncredited) male vocals amidst her improvisations. “Rokminoff” goes more into a Brazilian mode (the piano seems to have lifted the riff from Sergio Mendes’ version of “Berimbau”) and includes an accomplished bass solo from Jon Evans. She continues on a bossa mode with her take on Komeda’s “No Go Sleep,” and concludes the album with a haunting cover of Miles Davis’ “Blue in Green” in which Pater takes on Davis’ lead with her voice. Purists might argue that the album lacks direction by featuring too many styles, but that is exactly its strongest characteristic, keeping the music fresh even after multiple plays. (Ernest Barteldes)”
Music.newcity.com

“The Polish jazz vocalist changes it up for her second release by reinventing scat singing for the pomo/electronic age. Art hipsters will want to make this art chick one of their own although they can hold her but they can never have her as she knows how to evanescently slip and slide away when you think you are looking at her but are really looking in another direction. You probably won’t get it but it’s sure to catch your girl friend by surprise. Listen and learn.”
Midwest Record

“If you are thirsting for some moving jazz vocals, Beata will quench your thirst, to be sure. A grand excursion through 13 vocal adventures that will both enchant and enlighten your jazz outlook. I particularly enjoyed Beata’s interpretation of “Afro Blue“… many times when vocalists take a jazz classic like that, they try to force it into some vocal mold that was never intended, but Ms. Pater fits the tune to her vocal talent like a silk glove & still projects her lively and energetic spirit through all 4:41! If you’re lookin’ for something a little more “groove-oriented”, you’ll definitely dig “Groove Ensemble“; it would have been nice if it were just a tad longer, though. My favorite, oddly enough, was Beata’s super-scat on “Fly Strip“… a tune that just keeps on “pushin’”!!!! I give this one a MOST HIGHLY RECOMMENDED, with an “EQ” (energy quotient) rating of 4.96. Get more information at Beata’s BLUE page. Dick Metcalf
Rotcod Zzaj“ “A follow-up to 2006′s Black, Polish vocalist Beata Pater’s Blue is a collaboration with pianist-composer Mark Little. Opening with an energetic take on Mongo Santamaria’s “Afro Blue” and closing with Miles Davis and Bill Evans’ “Blue in Green,” nine of the remaining tunes are credited to Pater and/or Little. Pater isn’t singing lyrics on these recordings, but rather scatting with clarity and precision on both melody lines and solos. Blue, while always hovering near a contemporary jazz ambiance, covers a great deal of stylistic ground. Blue is a highly inventive album with a variety of moods and textures. The intro to Little’s “West Wind” roars out of the gate, recalling David Bowie’s “Young Americans” thanks to the beefy sax of Mikole Kaar. “Southbound Train” opens with a duet between Pater and bassist Jon Evans before Kaar joins them on clarinet. The trio cast a smoothly melodic spell. Composed as an emotional response to Michael Jackson’s memorial service, written by Pater and Little as they watched the telecast, “The Little Prince” is a mournful piano ballad. “Fly Strip,” another Pater/Little composition, kicks a solid groove with a bold, funky sax solo by Darius Babazadeh. Loaded with memorable hooks, it’s a very accessible album. James Scotch”
Meditation Secrets
Seattlepi.com 
Blogcritics.org

O’s Notes: Polish born vocalist, Beata Pater makes her US debut with Blue but she is hardly a rookie. She is influenced by Brazilian samba and incorporates a lot of that genre into her style along with some avant-garde. Beata uses vocalese to express herself and pours her heart out especially on tunes like “The Little Prince”. We also enjoyed “Southbound Train”, “Freedom Song” and the spirited “Fly Strip” where she scats in unison with bassist Jon Evans in what turns into a funky beat allowing each of them to solo freely. That groove spills over into “Sludgeekee”. Take a listen and don’t be surprised if you get hooked!” D. Oscar  Groomes
O’s Place Jazz Magazine

“Wordless vocalise is the order of the day with Beata Pater, somewhere between Tania Marie and Flora Purim for the Brazilio-Latin zone. Her album Blue (B&B 04-09) is the second colaboration on a color theme with pianist Mark Little. It includes several rearranged classics (“Afro Blue,” “Blue in Green”) a few Komeda compositions and then the rest by Pater, Little or both. This is jazzed Latin with a varied instrumentation. Beata is out front as the principal “horn”, singing a great deal but staying pretty close to the head melody much of the time. There is almost too much of her. Her vocalisms are relentless. And the band gets a pretty standard groove going all too often. It has some very nice moments and will surely be getting airplay on stations that prefer somewhat commercial sorts of jazzology. It is quite pleasant. The more I listened, the less I personally responded, alas. I like the IDEA of this music. I just don’t much like listening to it. For the Komeda I am glad, for the rest I grant that it will be liked by those that will like it. I wish her success.  Grego Applegate Edwards”
Gapplegateguitar

“Beata Pater has been performing and releasing music for years, and with Blue (B&B) she continues to expand her world of jazz to show that she is more than capable of covering a wide range of music and styles, all while holding on to her foundation while flirting with it. She reminds me a bit of Al Jarreau in that she does a lot of scat, but it’s not all that she does. She does it quite well, and it’s what she does with it that made me want to listen to the entire album not once, but twice. Her choice of material to cover will make any music fan get ear boners: “Afro Blue” (Mongo Santamaria) and “Blue In Green” (Miles Davis) will made jaded fans want to hear more, while her originals are quite remarkable and will make you want to know what she’s like in a live setting. Find out for yourself.”
thisisbooksmusic.com